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BlackManGrove: Black Ice 1109 November 8, 2009

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BlackManGrove: Black Ice 1109, originally uploaded by afsart.

An extension of an work “Soul On Ice”. In this work the form of the BlackManGrove is encased within a cubic framework. The Object within is revealed through the interior contours. I love that the three dimensional form is revealed within based on the light and the viewers location from te piece. The refraction and reflections of the light reveal the modeling of the form.

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FDMSummer09: Update November 2, 2009

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PA261308, originally uploaded by afsart.

This is the Bronze cast created from the FDM model begun during the Summer of 2009. I have completed almost all of the devestment of the ceramic shell and chasing. That was fun. I am currently thinking about how I want to move forward with the patination for this piece. I really like the open nature of the form. Overall I am very happy with how this turned out. More updates as the work progresses.

[fab_lab]_SCAD: AuthorShape November 2, 2009

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[fab_lab]_SCAD: AuthorShape, originally uploaded by afsart.

Enlisting the help of photography majors, each member of Fab.Lab.SCAD was instructed to “paint” a fluid form using a light source in front of the open shutter of a digital camera, beginning and ending in the same position so as to ensure continuous author-shapes were created. The digital photos were randomized and presented to the group, where each member was then asked to pick a shape. Each photo was placed in Abobe Illustrator and live-traced, producing vectors that could be exported into Rhinoceros. These author-shapes were arranged in a random vertical sequence, removing individual identification and any resulting sense of hierarchy within the group. Using a loft command a seamless surface was created through a series of continuous curves between each author-shape. The resulting form derived from unity and balance represents the individual role in collective collaboration: the column.

Soul on Ice July 12, 2009

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Soul on Ice, originally uploaded by afsart.

A new twist on a old direction. In the previous work light was used to illuminate the form described and activate the form hidden within the cardboard corrogation. The resultant work has a ghost like quality. In this exploration Plexi-Glass is used to explore the interior and exterior domains of form. This work is a proof of concept for further sculptural exploration of digital fabrication techniques. The title is taken from the book written by Eldrige Cleaver.

Blue Magic April 16, 2009

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afsart | parametric portrait, originally uploaded by afsart.

Patination is one of the final steps in bronze sculpture.

The SCAD Irascibles April 4, 2009

Posted by afsart in afsart, andrew f. scott, artwork, digital fabrication.
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Digital Fabrication Club

Digital Fabrication Club

Exploring digital technologies + Collaboration of Art & Design = Digital Fabrication.

Through collaboration and an open forum environment learn to use digital fabrication as a tool that can progress your art & design as well as push the boundaries of digital applications. Explore applications of the laser cutter, fused deposition modeling (FDM), CNC milling, and computers software to generate physical objects relevant to you major and interests. Facilitate the creative minds of the student body by exploring fabrication as a tools that will merge art and design into a collaborative hub.

Andrew F. Scott: Digital Slices II March 19, 2009

Posted by afsart in artwork, digital sculpture, laser.
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Andrew F. Scott: Digital Slices II

The internet is an interesting place. I was surfing around and I found this work linked to an interesting Chinese website entitled the Aesthetic Computing: Social Media Sculpture site, The tag above the image translated to “Transparency”, but what do I know. I will have to consult one of my chinese students to put it into proper context for me. The site also provided me with the inspiration to learn how to post slideshows from flickr to my wordpress blog.  Nice……….

Andrew F. Scott | Serial Studies II March 16, 2009

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Andrew F. Scott | Serial Studies II, originally uploaded by afsart.

waffle02

I love it when a plan comes together. This sculpture builds on ideas from an earlier post Solving the Mystery of the Half-Lap Joint. The work represents an expansion of the exploration of half – lap joinery techniques, rhino modeling and laser cutting fabbing techniques. The IAAC Pipe project was the inspiration for this project. This work is actually number III in the series, I had to throw away the second work because the joint tolerances were too tight. I had to increase the size of the joints to accommodate the radial structure of the composition. I am happy with the expressive nature of the work that is revealed through this serial form. On to number 4.

Richard Hunt March 16, 2009

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Richard Hunt conducts a critique if student work at SCAD

Richard Hunt conducts a critique of student work at SCAD

Suffice it to say that I am a big fan of Richard Hunt and his sculpture. As an artist who fabricates steel through direct metal sculptural processes he has always been one of the artists that I looked up to. He is truly an American legend. He has provided a wonderful example of what is possible through grace, humility, hard work and creativity. So often you meet people and they fall short of the image that you held of them in your imagination. I am happy to say that Richard Hunt exceeded all the expectations that I had of him.

andrew f. scott: Digital Intaglio March 15, 2009

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andrew f. scott: Digital Intaglio04, originally uploaded by afsart.

Beach Channel Days:

As I think about this body of work I am reminded of an Akan word from Ghana West Africa, “Sankofa”, which translates into “go back and fetch it”. Stated another way it embodies the idea that you must understand your past in order to move into the future. In the spirit of Sankofa, I would like to talk about my exploration into digital intaglio.

I went to Beach Channel High School in Far Rockaway Queens. It was a magnet school for students who were interested in studying Oceanography and Marine Biology. At the time, unless you lived in Far Rockaway there was a very competitive process to get into this school. As a student at Marine Park Junior High in Brooklyn, New York I was in a special program whereby we completed grades 7-9 in two years. Even so, I was told that I needed to have perfect attendance in order to be considered for a slot in the institute of Oceanography at Beach Channel.

It was one of the happiest days in my life when I found out that I was accepted to the school. As a student in the Institute for Oceanography we had to attend a special summer orientation. There I was introduced to this wonderful man named Mickey Cohen who ran the Institute of Oceanography. During my time at Beach Channel he inculcated in me a love for the ocean, environment, science and an intellectual curiosity that has stayed with me until this day.

When the fall started I began to take art classes. It was in these classes that I met three mentors that would play an important part in my life; Renee Darvin Bernie Ratner and Bruce Degen. The Department was run by Renee Darvin, one of the great art educators and administrator of our time. She is currently at Columbia University’s Teachers College. Under her leadership she created a program that allowed our school to compete on the highest levels with the best art schools in the city. Every year Beach Channel was well represented at the Daily News High School Art exhibition at Lever House. During my senior year one of my drawings was featured in the Daily News. During my time at Beach Channel she took me under her wing and opened up the world of art and its history to to me while letting me know that I had a place in it.

Bruce Degen taught classes in illustration. He has a great wit and an infectous sense of humor. He taught us how to use pictures to tell stories and demanded an attention to detail. process and craft that I carry to this day. He is a wonderful book illustrator and one of the great  joys of my life was sharing and reading his books to my children.

My favorite teacher at Beach Channel was Bernie Ratner. He was a cool cat with an easy going manner, but he also knew how to let you know when you crossed a line. Working with him was such a joy because he would always try to find a solution to make your work better. He taught our life drawing class on Wednesday evenings, that’s right life drawing in  high school. Getting my mother to sign the permission slip and the resultant work was the source of many a discussions in my fundamentalist pentecostal home. That is another story. I also worked with Mr. Ratner on stage designs for our school plays, and he also taught a class in television broadcasting and video editing. Mr. Ratner also taught printmaking and more specifically intaglio printing, it was in that process that I found the passion for an artform that would literally save my life. So when I am sitting at the laser watching it engrave plexiglass plates from my computer files and when I am pulling prints in the printmaking lab, my mind wanders and finds its way to these great educators that had such a positive impact o my life.